Tag Archives: travel

#TBT: Memories of London | BEDA Day 7

Around this time four years ago, I was gallivanting around London as one of the many study abroad students who arrive in the country each year. Studying abroad was always part of my undergrad plan, but I wasn’t sure where (or when) I would go. In the end I went with what now seems like the safest option in retrospect. I didn’t have to learn a new language, I was familiar with the culture, and the time difference wasn’t as bad as somewhere like Australia. The safe option turned out to be the best choice, though.

My 11 weeks in London were some of the best of my life. I know how typical that sounds: “I studied abroad and it changed my life! OMG I’m so CuLtUrEd!!!” Seriously, I would do it all again in a heartbeat. There were challenges along the way – I did get homesick and the classes were difficult. I came home feeling much more independent, though, and ultimately felt really comfortable in the city. Plus, I had the best group of flatmates around.

In honor of #tbt, here are a some of my favorite memories of my time abroad, in the form of crappy photos pulled off of Facebook.

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My parents did a bit of traveling of their own while I was abroad. They met up with me in London for Mother’s Day weekend before heading off on a two week tour of Ireland. While they were in town, we decided to take a day trip to Bath and Stonehenge, because you can’t go to Southern England without visiting Bath and Stonehenge. My folks don’t do anything half-assed, so we booked a tour that allowed us to get up close and personal with the stones after the park had closed to the public. This is definitely the way to go if you can swing it. Of course you can’t actually touch the stones, getting so close to something so ancient is really freaking cool. Also there are lots of sheep.
elephant house edinburgh london study abroadI so wish you could actually see out the window in this photo. One weekend in April, a couple of us took an overnight Megabus (not recommended) to Edinburgh to see what Scotland had to offer. We arrived around 7am, before most shops and cafes in Old Town opened. After some frustrated wandering, we found The Elephant House, empty and just opening for the day. I believe Jo Rowling herself was shining her light on me at that moment because a) I was starving and exhausted and b) as the “birthplace of Harry Potter,” The Elephant House is almost always packed. We got an amazing seat with a view of Edinburgh Castle and stuffed our faces with eggs. As you can tell from the above photo, I was very content.

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Sometimes your favorite band announces that their first set of shows in a few years will take place in Ireland. While you’re studying in London. And your friend (also a huge fan) is living in Glasgow. You have to go, right? Right. That’s exactly what I did. I spent a total of 48 hours in Ireland, 4 of which were spent on buses between Dublin and Limerick, the site of the concert. It was so worth it, though. Dolan’s Warehouse is a much smaller venue than the ones Franz Ferdinand typically plays in the states, and we ended up standing just a few rows from the front. The new songs, which eventually made up their 2013 album “Right Thoughts, Right Words, Right Action,” sounded great. I saw them again when they headlined the Field Day festival in London a few weeks later, which means I’ve officially seen them play in three different countries. Does that make me a groupie? Who knows.

climbing lion trafalgar square london study abroad

Everyone has to climb a lion in Trafalgar Square when they come to London. It’s a rite of passage, apparently. On my last night in London, a friend of mine invited me to help him shoot something for his webseries in the wee hours of the morning. We ended up staying up all night and found ourselves in Frafalgar Square at 4am. It was far from deserted, but as I was flying home in about 8 hours, I figured now was my chance to ride one of these majestic iron creatures. With a little help from my friends, I conquered the beast. Later, we watched the sun rise along the Thames, perfectly lighting up Parliament. Somehow I still made my flight.
I’m ready to go back to London right about now. If anyone has a job for me over there, or a couple thousand dollars lying around, hit me up.

TSA Pre-Check: A Review | BEDA Day 6

I may pretend to be a travel expert on the internet, but in reality I don’t fly all that often. I don’t travel for work and I can only scrape together so many vacation days (and so much cash), so I only average about 6-8 flights per year. Despite this, in a hopeful attempt to manifest some more travel into my life, I decided to register for TSA PreCheck ahead of my trip to Hawaii and California last December. I had watched my family and friends abandon me in the airport security line for their shorter, more streamlined TSA PreCheck screening one too many times. It was my turn to be one of the traveling elite. Registering for PreCheck was..a bit of a process, but one I believe was worth it. Here’s how it all went down.

Registration

The application process for TSA PreCheck comes in two parts: an online application and an in-person interview. The online application mostly consists of personal information and I found it pretty easy to navigate. Once that was complete, I was asked to schedule an appointment at a local ID center. Of course, the center closest to me was booked for a good month, so I went with the next best option: Brooklyn.

I’ll be honest, the ID center in Brooklyn was so nondescript, I was sure the security guy in the lobby had misdirected me. I actually went downstairs again to make sure I was going to the right place. I eventually found some signage and didn’t have to wait too long to be seen. The woman conducting my interview wasn’t particularly cheery, but after several trips to the DMV I wasn’t expecting much. She basically asked me the same questions from the online application (you can actually do both in the office), scanned my license, and took my fingerprints. I was also recovering from getting stitches in my thumb, so this took a few tries. Overall, the process was shorter than my actual trip to Brooklyn and I was approved a few days later.

Flying With PreCheck

I’ll be honest, I was pretty pumped to see the words “TSA PreCheck” on my boarding pass when we checked in for our flight to Kauai. The line at security wasn’t that much longer than the standard one, but it did move a bit faster since we didn’t have to take off our shoes, belts, pants, etc. Of course, I got “randomly selected” for a pat-down my first time out the gate. There wasn’t much I could do there, I guess. At least I still didn’t have to take off my shoes.

PreCheck was extra helpful on our flight from Kauai to Honolulu, as the tiny Lihue airport was packed with post-Christmas travelers. As a major American airline, I shouldn’t have been surprised to see Hawaiian Airlines opting in to the PreCheck program. We were able to get through security with a little extra time to grab some last-minute Kauai gifts.

Overall, I’d say that TSA PreCheck is worth the $85 fee. I’m set for the next 5 years, and I plan to get as much travel in as possible in that period of time. Though the program isn’t available everywhere, it does make the whole security process much easier, and the flying experience generally more pleasant.

You can find out more about the TSA PreCheck program here.

Christmas at Disneyland | BEDA Day 3

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When I was a kid, one of my favorite things to watch was this video about Christmastime at Disneyland. I’m not entirely sure if this was one of those vacation-planning videos you could send away for or just a special that had aired on the Disney Channel at some point, but I couldn’t get enough of it. I don’t remember it having a distinct plot or anything. It mostly consisted of Mickey & Co. galavanting about the park, getting ready for the holidays. Something about that video was incredibly comforting, and I always dreamed of visiting the park that Walt built during the festive season.

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In a stunning turn of events, this dream finally came true this past Christmas. I somehow convinced my parents it would be a good idea to stop by Disneyland on the way home from Hawaii, so we decided to spend New Years in the park. Now, if you know anything about Disneyland, you know that this is the busiest time of the year. The park was packed to the gills with locals and tourists alike looking for prime spots for the midnight fireworks. Nevertheless, it was all worth it when I got to see the Christmas Parade.

toy soldiers disneyland christmas parade

The parade hasn’t changed much since the 90s, save for the addition of a few new characters like Elsa from Frozen and Princess Tiana from The Princess and the Frog. I pretend to be cool, but when I saw the toy soldiers marching down Main Street USA, I teared up a little. The thing I had dreamed about for 20 years was real and right in front of my face. I had made it home.

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I may be an East Coast girl, but ever since I first visited in 2011, Disneyland has always felt like my place. The park has a much more laid-back vibe than Walt Disney World in Florida. So many locals visit Disneyland on a regular basis, that it never feels like people are putting pressure on themselves to have the best time ever. It’s just a place to hang out, like Central Park here in New York (albeit with a much higher admission fee). Plus, Disneyland is Walt’s park, the only one he saw completed. Walt Disney is a very problematic figure in history, but his ingenuity was undeniable. I guess I feel like I’m soaking up the remnants of his creative energy while I’m there. I may come home feeling physically depleted, but I always leave inspired.

paradise pier disney california adventure

Want to see some more of my Disneyland shenanigans? I made a video of my culinary journey through Disney’s California Adventure a few months ago. Check out what I ate in the park below!

Confessions of a Broke Travel Points Junkie | BEDA Day 2

I signed up for my first travel credit card this year.

I’ve always been wary of credit cards. The idea of “free money” always seemed attractive, but growing up in the recession, I’d heard so many horror stories of people ruining their finances with them. Considering I had no credit after graduating from college, I figured it might be time to give one a try. A year later, I found they weren’t so scary after all.

Now that I’m settled in NYC, I want to get some more travel under my belt. Which can be pricey. I might not be traveling on The Points Guy’s level, but if I can offset some of the costs of travel with points and miles, all the better.

I started with Amtrak Guest Rewards. I travel home to Philly at least once a month on Amtrak, and with their rewards program, I earn 2 points per dollar spent. They recently changed their redemption system, so it costs less points to get a ticket. I haven’t earned quite enough points, though, and when I do I may just hoard them for a bigger trip or tickets to a show via Audience Rewards.

When I decided to bite the bullet and get a travel credit card, I decided to go for the card with the lowest possible risk (in my eyes). I’m still broke after all. My bank offers a card with a decent point-per-dollar-spent rate and no annual fee. These general travel credit cards let you redeem points for any number of travel costs, from airfare to hotels to taxis. I’ve found this to be the easiest way to earn points as it doesn’t depend on how much you actually travel. Plus, I got a big old points bonus for spending a certain amount of money (and paying it off) within the first 3 months. Win.

I’m not particularly loyal to any airline. I like to go with whoever offers the best fare and flight times for my trip. Despite this, I did recently join the American Airlines AAdvantage and JetBlue TrueBlue programs. This was kind of a “screw it” move. These airlines fly out of my main travel hubs (Philadelphia and New York respectively), and have decent programs with lots of brand partners. If I’m going to fly on either airline, I might as well make the most out of it. It was free to sign up and I’ll at least get a magazine subscription out of it.

How do I keep track of all these points (ha)? My favorite tool at the moment is AwardWallet. This site automatically keeps track of your awards points in a variety of programs (including retail loyalty programs like Sephora Beauty Insider) and lets you know when points are about to expire. No need to log into each site individually to check your point balance. AwardWallet has you covered.

I may be earning slowly right now, but eventually I’ll have enough points to at least fund half of a trip to one of my bucket list locations. What are your thoughts on award travel, friends?

Shut Up and Write, Already | BEDA Day 1

I’ve been thinking about identities a lot recently.

DON’T CLICK AWAY YET. This won’t take long.

I, like many others, kind of define myself by what I do. Vlogger, performer, assistant, traveler, they’re all hats I’ve worn over the years. One title I’ve felt particularly distant from recently is one of the one’s I’ve held the longest – writer. I talk so much about writing and wanting to write and other people’s writing…and yet I’m not actually writing all that often.

Part of it is the job. I work 50 hours a week, 90% of which is spent in front of a computer. It’s pretty difficult to motivate yourself to sit in front of a screen and churn out words after doing so for 10 hours straight. Of course, plenty of writers can make it work. I just haven’t quite gotten to that point yet.

Another part of it is that I’ve started writing for other people – and getting paid for it. Which is great! Side hustles are super-important in this economy. However, I’ve found it hard to motivate myself to work on my own stuff when I can whip up a post for a client and make a few bucks. This all sounds more like a #humblebrag than a complaint, but it’s something I’m feeling. I only have so much creative energy to give.

It’s time to put those excuses aside. For this month at least.

In an attempt to get back in the swing of things, I’m taking part in BEDA – Blog Every Day in April. I have attempted these “create something every day” challenges before to varying degrees of success (High Point – completing Vlog Every Day in August in 2011, Low Point – giving up on VEDA after 3 days in 2012). The key to these challenges I’ve found is two-fold:

  1. Preparation – I’m writing some of these posts ahead of time. This might go against the rules in some writers’ minds, but I take “Blog Every Day in April” to mean “Post on your Blog Every Day in April.” And it’s my blog so I make the rules, punk.
  2. Being Okay with Imperfection – When you’re posting something new every day, sometimes it’s more important to just get something online than to make sure it’s the best thing you’ve ever written. Not everything I post this month is going to be great. It probably won’t even be that good. But it’ll be there.

So here we go. 30 posts in 30 days. Will it actually happen? We’ll see. But it doesn’t hurt to try. And I’m trusting y’all to keep me accountable. Comment, share with your friends, nag me on Twitter, whatever you feel like doing. I’m looking forward to this month, y’all.
Here we go.

Flora, Fauna, and Food Trucks | Oahu, HI

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A trip to Hawaii – at least for a first-timer – isn’t quite complete without a visit to the Aloha State’s capital, Honolulu. After a week of relaxing in Kauai I was really looking forward to visiting this legendary city and seeing a few more faces. I got all that and more upon arriving in Waikiki Beach.

Waikiki Beach is constantly buzzing with tourists from all over the world exploring the many shops, restaurants, and hotels that line the shore. The vibe is at once laid-back and upscale, with buildings housing both five-star restaurants and flip-flop shops. I had some of the best Japanese and Korean food of my life (so far) over my three days in town. My beefy lite bowl from the Kamitoku Ramen truck was better than some of the fancier meals I had over the trip.

 

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Speaking of food trucks, if you’re on your way to the North Shore and love shrimp, make a pit stop at Giovanni’s Shrimp Truck in Haleiwa. There’s only a few items on the menu (three styles of shrimp and a garlic hot dog) but it’s all fantastic. After waiting in line for about 20 minutes and fighting off fruit flies, I started to wonder if it was worth it, but that plate of shrimp scampi was a revelation. Go there.

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After stuffing our faces with shrimp, we stopped by Waimea Valley, an amazingly lush botanical garden and cultural site that brings visitors closer to nature and Native Hawaiian history. Walking down to the waterfall, you can see why its considered such a sacred place. It’s absolutely stunning even in winter, when most of the flowers aren’t in bloom. I can’t even imagine how it will look a few weeks from now.

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A trip to the North Shore isn’t complete without a stop at Sunset Beach, one of the top spots in the world for big wave surfing. You can’t really tell from the photos, but the surf was out of control that particular afternoon. I’m used to baby waves on the Atlantic. These swells were at least three times the size of the waves I’ve seen before major storms back home. Despite that, plenty of people were paddling out. I salute you, crazies.

Oh, there was also a double rainbow. So intense.

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Hawaii, you were good to me. I can’t wait to see you again soon.

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In case you missed it, check out the video I made of my Hawaiian adventures. While you’re in the neighborhood, I made 2 other somewhat travel-related videos during my blogging hiatus – one on moving to New York and the other on the people of Amtrak. Join me, won’t you?

The Real Jurassic Park | Kauai, HI

Happy January, my poor, abandoned bloggy friends! I may have taken a good month off from writing, but that month included plenty of travel. I spent my two weeks off from work in Hawaii and California, enjoying the sunshine, taking pictures, and gathering plenty of ideas for new #content. Apparently I can never give myself a real break.

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My parents and I started out our adventure on Kauai, one of the most lush islands of the Aloha State. After some rest to get over the massive jet lag (8 hours of flying is no joke), we got a real Hawaiian welcome at the Smith Family Garden Luau. The evening featured a tour of their gorgeous gardens, an amazing and authentic Hawaiian meal, and a show featuring the music and dance of the Polynesian islands. If you’re looking for a more classic luau, Smith’s does a fantastic job.

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We spent our next morning at Kauai’s Hindu Monastery, a site in the hills of central Kauai frequented by people of all faiths. The monastery is definitely worth a visit for its lush views and general sense of peace. There’s plenty of people on site who are happy to talk to you about the Hindu faith, show you around the grounds, and answer any questions you may have.

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From there, we drove down to the town of Kapaa for some lunch. Kapaa is home to plenty of great restaurants, but some friends of ours highly recommended Mermaids Cafe. It totally lived up to the hype. Unfortunately, I didn’t get a picture of the BEST TACOS OF MY LIFE, but just take my word for it. They were awesome. The hibiscus lemonade wasn’t bad, either.

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You may have seen a little dinosaur movie last summer by the name of Jurassic World. The real Jurassic Park happens to be on Kauai, namely on the Na Pali Coast. A lot of the exterior shots from the Jurassic Park movies were shot in these incredible seaside mountains, and no wonder why. This place is unreal. We took a sunset catamaran cruise with Holo Holo Charters and saw some of the most incredible sites. Plus, they fed us. Shout out to food.

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Much of the next day was spent kayaking and hiking our way up to Secret Falls in Wailua River State Park. I’m still impressed that I actually made it back to the hotel without dying. Four miles of kayaking and two miles of hiking in ankle-deep mud is much more physical activity than I’ve had in…a while. But it was all worth it for the view. You don’t see that every day in Manhattan. And if you do, you should probably call the fire department.

hotel lobbycockatoo

We spent our week at Marriott’s Kauai Beach Club, right on Kalapaki Bay. The whole property was lush and gorgeous, with lots of open-air spaces. The lobby/courtyard area, with its manmade waterfalls and stocked koi pond was one of my favorite parts of the resort. Plus, occasionally this cockatoo would make an appearance, shouting “Aloha” at the guests passing through. He was the best.

Kauai, you were good to me. Mahalo for your incredible hospitality to those of us just passing through. I know I’ll be back soon enough.

Looking for some more visuals of the Aloha State? Check out the video I put together with some of my favorite moments from my Hawaiian adventure!

 

5 Places On My Travel Bucket List

We’re closing in on winter, the season where my wanderlust is at its worst. When the temperatures drop, there’s nothing I want more than to hop on a plane and get the heck out of dodge. I don’t necessarily need to travel to a warmer spot, I just need to get away from the dreary mess that is a New York City winter. This wanderlust has got me thinking about my travel bucket list, all the places I’d love to go before I retire in Monterrey and build my army of sea otters. Here are a few of the spots that are currently high on my list.

Shiny houses

Madeira, Portugal

This small island off the coast of Northern Africa may be a popular tourist destination for Europeans, but it holds a special place in my heart. From what I’ve been told, my mom’s family is originally from Madeira and lived there for years before coming to America. I’d love to explore this island and learn more about how my ancestors lived. Plus it’s just freaking gorgeous.    

Obelisco de Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires, Argentina

I’ll blame my middle school obsession with the musical Evita for this one. Buenos Aires is a truly global city with a rich culture and diverse population. To be honest, I feel like I don’t know that much about the city aside from its history. I definitely want to check out the theatre scene, maybe check out an opera at the Teatro Colon. Maybe I can improve my dismal Spanish skills while I’m there, too.

Road to Uluru

Australia

I can’t really choose one city in Australia that I absolutely need to visit. Ideally, I would make a longer trip out of it, visiting the Gold Coast, the Outback, and cities like Sydney and Melbourne. The landscape there is so totally different from where I live now and just so amazing. I’m willing to risk getting eaten by any of the million animals that can kill you if I can hang out with one koala. 

 Slussen, Stockholm

Stockholm, Sweden

Cool design! Herring! Ridiculously hot people! What doesn’t Sweden have? As an avid Eurovision fan, I need to know what it is about this country that keeps them churning out pop stars. I love the way the city blends old and new and remains on the cutting edge while respecting its rich history. Plus, flights are pretty cheap on Norwegian Air. Maybe I can make this happen sooner rather than later.

Jackson Square

New Orleans, LA

Bringing it back stateside for this last city. Over the last ten years, New Orleans has showed the world that nothing can keep her down. This city is very much alive and I want to be a part of it (at least for a few days). I’m yearning to listen to some jazz and eat po boys until I become one myself (literally and figuratively). Seeing as New Orleans is the closest city on my list, I should probably get on this one soon.

 
Bloggy peeps, has the travel bug bit you recently? Where are you itching to go? Let me know what’s on your list in comments!

Brunch and Bowling | A Weekend in Minneapolis

When Minneapolis was announced as the host city for the inaugural Nerdcon: Stories, it didn’t seem like the most obvious choice. I’ve traveled to more “destination” cities like LA and San Diego before for conventions, but never anywhere too far north. Regardless, I was excited to spend some time in Minneapolis during the con. I haven’t traveled extensively in the midwest, so Minnesota is some uncharted territory.

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Unfortunately, thanks to the nature of conventions, we didn’t have a ton of time for sightseeing. We still managed to find some cute places to eat, though. One of my favorite spots in town is Hen House, a bar, bakery and breakfast joint just a few blocks from the convention center. My friends and I had some killer omelettes and mimosas between sessions on Saturday morning. Hen House is known for their giant cinnamon rolls (which are heavenly), but the crown jewel of the menu in my mind is their hash browns. Crisp, delicious, and very filling. I’m a sucker for some good potatoes. Our first breakfast was so good, we decided to come back for more on Sunday.

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On Saturday night, we headed over to Brit’s Pub for dinner and drinks. Most pubs in America are pretty interchangeable in my mind, but Brit’s local charm and great selection of pub grub sets it apart. They have a great selection of local brews and to sip on their awesome roofdeck. We had some great weather all weekend and were happy to take full advantage of it.

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Brit’s also has a super cool green rooftop for lawn bowling and the occasional screenings. Sadly, no one was out bowling that night, but I would happily go back for a round the next time I’m in Minneapolis. We did get to catch an amazing sunset on our way out, which perfectly complemented the old-timey streetlights on the rooftop.

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Of course, what would a weekend in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area be without a cheeky trip to that great monument to Capitalism, the Mall of America? My friends and I actually did a good deal of shopping between MoA and the the flagship Target in downtown Minneapolis. Although we decided to pass on the amusement park, we did score some pretty great deals (no sales tax on clothing in MN!) and put a few miles on our boots. Nick Cannon also happened to be shooting a segment for TeenNick at the mall that afternoon, so we were in good company.

MoA

Sure, most of my non-convention time in Minneapolis was spent eating or shopping, but I still had a great time. I’ll most likely be back next year, hopefully with a bit more time to explore the city.

Have you been to Minneapolis? What are some of your favorite spots in the city? Give me some recommendations for next year in the comments!

5 Amazing Moments from Nerdcon: Stories 2015

After 6 Vidcons, I can count on Hank Green and his team to run a great conference that caters to both fans and creators. Their events manage to be equal parts variety show, public forum, master class, and party, which always leads to a good time. While Vidcon centers around the more specific world of online video, Nerdcon: Stories tackles storytelling, an artform as old as…well, people. I was curious to see how this event, the first of its kind, would play out, so I bought a pass and headed to Minneapolis.

What I experienced at NC:S was a celebration of how stories are created and how they connect us all. “We are all made of stories,” was the general refrain of the weekend, and both attendees and presenters brought stories to share. I left on Sunday feeling emotionally energized and inspired to create, albeit physically exhausted from three days of walking around the giant Minneapolis Convention Center. Here are some of my favorite moments from this year’s conference.

Paul Sabourin’s Opening “Why Stories Matter” Keynote

Throughout the conference, several special guests were invited to give their take on why stories matter. Paul Sabourin, one half of Paul and Storm, kicked off the first morning session on Friday in his hilarious and high-energy fashion, running through a (very) brief history of storytelling. Sure, it mainly focused on storytelling in western civilization (as most history classes in America do), but it gave us all a good idea of why stories have been so prominent throughout history. Ultimately, we tell stories to feel less alone in the world, to relate to each other. Whether their true or not, stories have the power to connect us. 

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Leslie running the story circle like a champ.

Leslie’s Story Circle

Have you met my friend Leslie? Aside from being a fabulous human and great friend, Leslie created and curates “One Time Stories“, a storytelling web series in the vein of The Moth and StoryCorps. It’s truly amazing and I suggest you check it out and submit if you’re so inclined. As a featured guest (#proudmama), Leslie hosted a storytelling circle on Friday night which drew a huge crowd. People shared heartfelt and hilarious stories of firsts: first kisses, first times crying in public, first poop explosions (go with it). There’s something so simple and great about just sitting in a huge circle, kindergarten style, and listening to people sharing their truth.

“Honing Your Craft” Panel

As a writer, I’m always looking for ways to embetter my word-doing, so I jumped at the chance to listen to a panel of great writers talk about their process. The panel featured several novelists who write across several genres – including Lev Grossman, Stephanie Perkins, and Nalo Hopkinson – whose processes are as diverse as their writing styles. They were each brutally honest about their struggles to get words on the page. Nalo spoke in particular about working with ADHD, which was incredibly important to me. Once again, I had a moment of feeling less alone.

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From left: Paul Sabourin, Paul DeGeorge, Cecil Baldwin, Sarah Mackey, and Leslie Datsis on the “Communities and Fandom” Panel

Dylan Marron’s “Why Stories Matter” Keynote

Speaking of representation, Dylan Marron’s take on why stories matter was one of the most powerful moments of NC:S. Marron, known for his “Every Single Word…” video series and for playing Carlos on Welcome to Night Vale, touched on how storytelling helps us build empathy by showing us how we fit into the world. When we tell universal stories with only white faces, we essentially deny the existence of people of color. The fact that hundreds of (mostly young) people got to hear this in the convention center’s main auditorium gives me hope for the future. You can check out a video of the speech here.

Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind

Sometimes, you have to fly to the midwest and attend a major conference to see a show that’s performed twice a week in your own city. Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind is an ever-changing show by the New York Neo-Futurists, in which a group of actors attempts to perform 30 plays in 60 minutes. They introduce new plays each week, and the order of plays is determined by the audience, so you never know what you’re going to see. I was incredibly excited to see TMLMtBGB, and the Neos did not disappoint. Each play managed to be poignant, true, and funny within the limited time. Above all, the Neos are genuine, and I love that. Kevin R. Free is a delight. I want to be best friends with Desiree Burch and Kate Jones. And Jeffrey Cranor brought me close to tears more than once over the weekend. I’m now determined to get to a Neos show in New York before the year is out.

It’s safe to say I had an amazing time this weekend at NerdCon: Stories. I’ll definitely be back next year, hopefully with some stories of my own. In between all this awesome, I learned that Minneapolis is a wonderful city that we should all move to (6 months out of the year). Stay tuned for more on my Minneapolis adventures next week!